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in europe are trading lower as ben bernanke warns monetary policy may not be enough to offset the damage if the u.s. economy goes over the fiscal cliff. >>> and the fed takes the new and surprising step in its ongoing efforts to boost the economy, tying interest rates directly to the u.s. unemployment rate. >>> plus, investors cheering the plan to save danone's plans to offset losses over the next two years. >> announcer: you're watching "worldwide exchange," bringing you business news from around the globe. >>> welcome to the program. coming up on today's show, we'll be plenty busy. we head out to tokyo where carry enjoji has been talking about the upcoming elections. then, we hone in on central london where one pilot project is living roof and major buildings. find out what green living can do go r to improve the area. >>> and today, the 1 billionth international tourist will reportedly arrive at a destination in the world. at 11:20 central time, we'll speak to the world travel council to find out why france is still the world's top destination but more money is spent in the u.s. and c
happy about what is happening in europe. german stocks are soaring. is it too late to get in? > > we saw the dax push up to a 52-week high last week. really the key here is safety. they are using that stock market as their safety gauge if they are trading over in europe. so, if the safety play continues to warrant being ultra- conservative, yeah, you are going to see that market continue to move upward. if traders want to take on a little bit more risk and spread to some of the other european sovereign-debt nations like spain or greece, then you are probably going to see that safety play back off a little bit. > there are always places to park money. good to have you on the show this morning. have a great trading day. > > you too. if you're not yet fully awake this monday, here's one thing to open your eyes: after years of higher and higher coffee prices to consumers, brazil, which produces a third of the world's coffee, may turn prices around. a record crop there last year is being followed by another bumper crop. our cover story takes a look at what it means for coffee futures and reta
, the financial crisis in europe is providing an opportunity for china. earlier this year, we heard from new york times reporter liz alderman on a chinese shipping company that is making waves in greece. > > how successful has this shipping company, known as cosco, been so far in greece? > > it's an interesting story. this chinese basically state- run shipping company came in here about three years ago in a $500 million deal that ever since then has been a model for the country, because what they did is they bought half of piraeus port, which is an ancient port in greece and one of the most important ports in the southern mediterranean. what they did was they basically took an operation that had been effectively lagging under greek ownership and completely turned it around. > > have the the greek people been welcoming of this? the chinese work way is much different from the european way, let's say. > > the chinese have an extremely efficient working practice. as one spokesman there put it to me, they basically run their business by showing that they work 24/7, that has actually rung alarm bells,
. the intermediate nuclear forces treaty, or inf, led to the destruction of thousands of europe-based nuclear missiles on both sides. speakers here will include former assistant secretary of state richard burt, former u.s. ambassador to the soviet union, jack matlock, and will also there from former assistant secretary of state rozanne ridgway. the american foreign service association posted this hour and 20 minute event. >> i would like to wish all other good morning. one. i'm susan johnson, the president and i would like to extend a very warm welcome to you all. and thank you for coming to this important and special panel discussion. and also celebration of the 25th anniversary of the signing of the historic treaty. special thanks of course go to our panelists and our moderator, ambassadors matlock, ridgeway and bert, for sharing their experiences and reflections surrounded the complex negotiations that led to this treaty which was a significant factor in reducing dangers of the cold war. i'm sure you know all of these three imminent folks but i would just like to say a quick word. about th
reflect a positive outlook. some encouraging news on europe's economic crisis: standard and poor's gave greece a better grade. it got upgraded to a "b-minus" from "selective default" thanks to reassurances that greece will stay in the eurozone. on wall street, the dow rose 115 points, the nasdaq gained almost 44, and the s&p added 16. our next guest says any reasonable fiscal cliff deal is better than no deal. he's robert doll, chief equity strategist and senior portfolio manager at nuveen asset management. >> susie: hi, bob. nice to see you again. >> thanks, susie. >> susie: so investors and traders really do seem to think that a deal is coming, like our previous guest, roger altman. is this rally all about hopes for a deal or something nore fundamental? >> it is about hope for a deal. the malaise and the lack of confidence and the uncertainty has been pervasive, as you well know, susie. that has held corporations back from doing things, from spending money, and some individuals as well. as roger said a few minutes ago, if we can clear the air with some sort of fiscal cliff deal, i thi
you very much. a key session in japan overnight. >>> as we pivot our focus to europe, you see stocks addi adding .3%. consistent with the rally we've seen over the last several trading sessions and apparently having plenty to do with the possible resolution of u.s. fiscal talks. we'll have more in a little bit. the survey also helping to lift sentiment or keep it buoyant. look at the major borses. green in the harder hit regions. ftse mib, spain up better than 1%. consistent with the rally we saw yesterday. remarkable. the xetra dax adding .1%. for its part, up to close to 30% this year. the ftse 100 adding .3. the bond space, we'll look at that and talk later about the big trades that have helped some hedge funds, for example, when it comes to greek debt. for the time being, mario's comments this summer is have techively kept the bond gleelds a tight range since then six months or so now, this is going. and differentiation across the space where italy price rising, not the case for spain which is seeing its yield up to 5.3. and i know we haven't mentioned this in a while, but i want
morning. all right. coming up new at 10, germany's chancellor angela merkel says europe will have to work very hard to it maintain its current standard of living. at the top of the hour, find out what she's saying about welfare and here is another development from overseas. we brought you the story last week, french actor gerard depardu, he is leaving home, leaving france because of higher taxes and handed in his passport. now, the french prime minister has some choice words for mr. depardu. he's obviously in the happy with him and find out exactly what he said at ten o'clock eastern time this morning. time is money. 30 seconds, here is what else we've got for you, an in japan, again, a landslide win, so, what's the new prime minister going to do about the world's worst debt problem? print more money and stimulate more, too. build more infrastructure. will that work? we have our own resident japan expert. question, is jeff immelt's cozy relationship with the president costing general electric shareholders money? we will be discussing it. and i lost on friday when i questioned "the washing
. so there is a similarity with what is happening in europe and what could happen here if we don't get our house in order. >> you talked about a single- minded focus, yet you are leaving with jobs undone. how do you feel about leaving at this particular point in time? >> we still have several weeks. we have laid out the plans and all these efforts i have been part of and other efforts as well. i still have some optimism that we will get this job done. one of the reasons i did not run again is the really wanted to focus these last two years. i knew if i was running, i would not be able to be in the hundreds of hours of negotiations i have been in. i believe many of the ideas we have generated will be part of any solution, whether it comes before the end of this year or early next year. i believe the work product we have produced will be part of the solution. >> you talked about no longer missing a 80% of family birthdays. what will you be doing then? >> i will be doing some speaking and doing some teaching. i have people starting to talk to me about other opportunities. i can assure you
losing month in nine years for mcdonald's, but they're doing well for breakfast and in europe. lori: thank you as always. melissa: president obama had to try to seeking more support for the fiscal cliff plan. peter barnes is here with the latest. >> just over an hour they will speak at a diesel engine plant persoextending tax cuts for fedl tax workers. keeping up the pressure on republicans to cave on taxes after the president and speaker john boehner met at the white house yesterday in a spokesperson said discussions with the white house are taking place, but we have no details to share about the substance of those conversations. they say perhaps the best strategy for them is to accept some higher tax rate the president is demanding, get that off the table and combat entitlement reform early next year the president can work for increasing the debt ceiling. republicans will have a little bit more leverage. speak a lot of people putting forward a theory, and i think it has merit for you give the president to 2% increass he is talking about, the rate increase on the top 2%, so there i
europe slip into the mediterranean. and so also given other asset classes equities appear to be relatively attractive. >> let's talk about that, actually. because did you ask the people that you survey what are the best asset csse and stks got-- was at the top of the list. let's look at the list here, followed by precious metals, commodities, bonds and cash at the bottom of the list. tell us a little bit pore about those rankings from investment managers? >> sure. and these are charter financial analysts that we survey, our members. they spend their time in the markets investing. and compared to last year, there is more pessimism about the prospect it's for bonds, for fixed income given the very low nominal level of yields. and also for cash where basically you cat get any return. equies we the clear favorite with over 50% of our respondents saying that they would be the best asset class. >> there is still some pessimism about europe, primarily coming from respondents, our members there. but there's more open coming from-- optimistic from charter financial analysts who are
the slots at heathrow. those remain the crown jewel in terms of the airline business going over to europe. if you have access to those slots, it's a much easier way to become profitable or increase your profits over in europe. by the way, there are 31 daily flights between the uk and north america. we'll find out exactly what happens in terms of frequent flier redemption possibilities between delta and virgin atlantic. remember, virgin atlantic is not part of any global alliance, not part of the sky team alliance, although many wonder if that's going to change with some time. take a look at shares of delta. richard anderson has had a nice little move here. some people would say, listen, this is all about jet fuel as it has moderated. there's something else at play here. we'll be talking with richard anderson about this at 11:40, first on cnbc. we'll talk to him after the press conference announcing this deal. you don't want to miss what he has to say. this is a ceo, and we've talked about it several times, who is trying to take the steps that will help delta grow in the future. you look a
, so how will he foot the bill? is a fat tax like the one that they have in europe the way to do it? a vat tax? a value added tax? is that story coming up next. how do traders using technical analysis streamline their process? at fidelity, we do it by merging two tools into one. combining your customized charts with leading-edge analysis tools from recognia so you can quily spot key trends and possible entry and exit points. we like this idea so much that we've applied for a patent. i'm colin beck of fidelity investments. our integrated technical analysis is one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. now get 200 free trades when you open an account. >> when you start talking about an issue of treatment of mental illness, the mentally ill should they have access to guns? well, there is a rational response that most americans have somebody who is not thinking clearly should not have a gun in their hands. but how do you define and that codify that into law? that's a much trickier issue. david: that was scott rasmussen with the latest poll on gun control and do
? >> not necessarily. we would stay with dividend payers. we would also dip our toe into europe into some very high-quality, multicountry stocks there. mostly on consumer discretionary stocks as well. >> george, we haven't forgotten you yet. scott, i have a question for you. just noticed today france and germany's stock markets hit 52-week highs. we're still wringing our hands over the debt crisis, and the equity markets are hitting new highs for the year. is it too late to get into those markets? >> i don't think so, bill, at all. all the european markets are up for the year except portugal, which is up slightly. even greece is up year to date. i don't think you're too late on that trade at all. in fact, i think, quite frankly, the structural changes that are happening in europe could produce growth for many years come. >> where are you putting money to work, george? >> the fiscal cliff is sort of the uncertainty du jour. people are always worried about next uncertainty. you need to blow past that and think about where the next good stocks going to be, how can i invest, how can i participate? taxe
cheaper? europe. >> germany and france at two-week highs last week. >> there's a few countries over there. i like the relative value there. they've got a printing press. they're going to open that. what i learned is you don't fight the tape and don't fight a bailout. i've got about 30% off this country -- outside of this country. and added 10% in emerging markets. now i think that we've had a bloodless revolution again in china, i think it's a great place. look at emerging markets. better value while you wait around. >> and they've done well over the last year. it was just they've been the silent gain. you haven't quite realized they've been doing so well. >> i like it. i wouldn't rush into anything. if you hid cash on the side, what a good time getting in. >> this market has stopped reacting on a minute by minute basis to all the prognostications out of washington on the fiscal cliff. what do you make of that? are we becoming complacent? are we immune? what are you talking about on the floor? >> we just had the president speak. nothing there. china numbers tomorrow. then germany. maybe n
is gloria. i come from europe. everybody talks about [indiscernible] most of us [indiscernible] we are the only ones that can produce babies. i was wondering with the crazy schedule you mentioned working until midnight how you balance family time and a career. the mother is the most important role in the family and for the child. the child is the future of everything we're talking about. how can a woman in the united states be independent with a career if she has had a child with no maternity leave? united states is way behind most other countries. they have maternity leave. there should not be fair when she goes to an interview -- there should not be fear when going to an interview. >> does anyone want to take that? >> i would be happy to do that. >> i have always gotten up at 4:30 or 5:00. i have a son. he is grown of now. when i get up, he is off living his life. my husband and i have always been in similar careers. that really helps a lot. over the years, i made choices on what i would do in order to create the flexibility for me to raise our son. i do think that is very import
, businesses started cutting back aggressively. and i think that was partly because of concern over europe. conference over china. businesses are running very, very clean right now. i do think there's capacity. >> and maybe that business investment will help the consumer who will feel the pinch of higher taxes? >> that's the hope ultimately is that you get that multiplier. businesses and corporations have been doing well, they have cash on the balance sheets and they start lending. i think one of the other crucial components is credit creation. it can't just come from large corporations. it has to come from medium and small bess. >>> coming up, bob doll gives us his outlook for the fed. linking rates to the unemployment rate. then at 8:00 eastern, a cnbc exclusive, david tepper, one of the world's top performing hedge fund managers will give us some of his investing wisdom and what will be a can't miss "squawk box" interview coming right back. [ penélope ] i found the best cafe in the world. nespresso. where i never have to compromise on anything. ♪ where just one touch creates the perf
, the meeting at the white house, 3:00 between the president and some congressional leaders. as for europe, getting some data out of japan overnight and some data out of europe. currently red arrows across the board, in london, paris, and frankfort. our road map begins at the white house. congressional leaders set to meet with the president, 3:00 p.m. this afternoon. senator reid has already said hopes of a deal are fading quickly. just two trading days left until the cliff. and it's not just the fiscal cliff. wind farms and dairy are set to get hit. >> the ports of the east coast and gulf coast are bracing for a potential strike. the potential for this, midnight sunday with a shutdown threatening to threaten 20% of the cargo traffic. >> and instagram feeling the sting of the flap around privacy with users, fleeing the site. how will this impact facebook? >> as we mentioned, dennis berman, "wall street journal" market place editor is joining us here on set once again for the next hour. good to have you back, dennis. lots to talk about between the cliff and other news. >> three days before
things worse. europe is doing it, southern europe. it keeps raising. the economy contracts even more. about to go in recession. japan raising taxes. why in the world we would apply that poison to ourselves. lori: that is the ultimatum from the white house, as you know. because of the president's reelection they have the leverage. so are the republicans going to have any choice but to cave especially on the issue of raising taxes for higher-income americans? >> well, there are small business owners. 63 percent, and people who create capitol, invest capital. we have seen in europe and france especially, that kind of thing does not work. he does not have a mandate to hurt the economy which is the way the republicans should phrase this thing. why harm the economy now. lori: edges of the economy fall off the cliff to iraq or raising the tax on the wealthy. >> with the republicans should do, making the point they're raising taxes is a bad thing to do, let's postpone this bank. better to do that than to give poison to the patient now. our economy is starting to slow again. give people pause
right after the open. as for the action in europe, taking its cues from the united states. we'll see a big rally in china extending one of its biggest rallies in three years. we have a mixed bag in europe with italy up by about .2 of 1%. >> we'll do our best to keep focused on the business day. we'll be following the tragic shooting in connecticut, of course. the new york stock exchange will hold a moment of silence to honor the victims in the next few moments, and we'll be looking at the president's call for meaningful action and the politics of gun control. >> let's get to a road map for this morning. it starts with apple. under pressure once again. even dipping below $500 a share at some point this morning. shares will remain range bound near term. iphone 5 sales and cannibalization among the region. >> other concessions from the gop, the speaker proposing tax hikes for millionaires. could this be the tipping point. moving the talks beyond deadlock. >> a big week for earnings. yes, earnings. fedex, research in motion among the companies reporting. so finally maybe we'll be talking
of war. two decades ago, with all eyes on europe, the united states prematurely celebrated victory over communism and an end to the cold war but in 1989, the same year the berlin wall fell, tanks roll spood tiananmen square crushing in a bloody massacre the hopes of the chinese people. while communism was gone in europe it was revitalized in the world's largest nation. pyongyang's missile launch awakens us to a fact that communism still casts a long shadow over asia. the nuclear proliveuation threaten not only our allies in the pacific but our own people as well. in asia the cold war never ended an the united states and south korean forces stand guard together on this last frontier. attempts to engage pyongyang over the past four years have been met with repeated prove cage. the kidnapping of two american journalists, repeated missile launches, one more nuclear test, the sinking of a south korean naval vessel with the loss of 46 lives and the shelling of a south korean island. how much more should we endure before we say enough is enough? sweet talking pyongyang only seems to inspire fu
fractionally. other news out of europe, debt tieback for from an day to receive additional buyback offers. those would be at deeply discounted prices and that would help lower the country's debt lead. >>> in asia, stocks touched a 16-month high and closed mostly higher on the session with good gains, as you can see, with the kospi up the most, 1.5 points. >> strong nebs out of china which suggest maybe the economy is rebounding more than expected. >> the exports. >> yeah. >> among the catalyst in asia trading today, economic stats out of china. export growths slowed sharply to 2.9% in december. that news j underscores the global headwinds dragging on the economy. but the chinese economy is showing solid signs of a pick up in domestic activity. industrial output was stronger than expected. the country has been saying for years it needs to shift a little bit from the export model the internal consumption. let their middle class grow and not be nearly as dependent on exports. and china's oil demand in november surpassed 10 million barrels per day for the first time ever. the country's crude
right now at where things stand in europe, you'll see that the ftse is barely higher. but you do see a bit of a decline for germany and france and modest moves across all of these markets. the bank of japan easing monetary policy again today, announcing an increase of its asset buying and lending program by more than $118 billion. that move was widely expected as part of the reason that you had seen the yen under quite a bit of pressure, yesterday, at least. you'll see right now that in japan, the market there actually closed down by just over 1%, 1.2% almost. the hang seng and the shanghai composite were slightly higher. oil prices this morning, you'll see right now, are down by about 4 cents to $89.94, so you have things to pick up in those prices over the last couple of days. and the ten-year note at this point which yesterday was yielding above 1.8%, dropping down to 77.2%. finally, take a look at the dollar and gold. yen is at 83.99. gold prices this morning with all these movements in the currency markets up by about $1.10. >>> winter storm draco is moving across the united sta
all closed in europe. only the uk, french, dutch and spanish stock markets are open and they're going to be closing early. there are now only five trading sessions left in 2012. get your act together. stocks and bonds, solid gains so far this year. the dow has advanced 8% in total. the s&p 500 up almost 14%. the nasdaq has jumped 16%. it's been a good year. the end of the year also means we are just days away from the fiscal cliff, however, and that's the bad news. and looming tax hikes, spending cuts, all of that. both sides warning a very big deal becoming a bit more unlikely. >> and my one bit of advice to speaker boehner is this. you cannot pass a bill with just republicans. on a broad thing like this, you need both. and he has put himself with plan b and sort of an impossible position. he has to get these hard right goes to go along with him. and he and the president were going to say we're going to pass a deal with the majority of republicans and the majority of democrats in the house and senate, we would get a mainstream deal. >> i think we're going to fall out of the fiscal tr
last time you liked europe. what about here in the united states? what would you buy here? >> well, i wouldn't buy anything if i haven't bought it already. i would sit around and wait. you've got she nan nanigans goi in washington. there are 535 people who have to think i want to keep my job. they'll decide to rise above. this is all going to be wonderful. in the meantime, if you're trying to figure out which way to go, i have traders out here who will tell you every day very difficult thing to do. >> isn't that the case. for sure. >> sandy, weigh in here. what would you be doing? >> actually i take a little bit different view. this fiscal cliff is a grander issue than just the united states. the drag in the u.s. is a big import to the rest of the world. stock markets are supposed to be leading economic indicators. if you look at the markets around the world from the last several weeks to months, the markets seem to be indicating just the opposite. they seem to be indicating that a deal will get done. what kind of deal whether it's one stage or two stage, nobody knows. but the fact of
is going to be, fiscal cliff going into the end of the year, we'll start to focus on europe and japan printing money over there. we'll get back into the macroeconomic horizons and see how it goes. but yeah. i think there's been some outflows in certain sectors, risk is on here. >> all right. bill nichols how are you playing this waiting game right now? >> i think one of the real interesting sectors one of the guests mentioned is the action in financials. you look at bank america and you haven't seen any real participation in the financial sector for four or five years. that's one to keep an eye on. you may see a meaningful move. that could be good for the market. >> you don't think it's too late -- >> -- next year in terms of a tax increase. >> bank of america is the best performing this year. it's not too late to get into that? you think there's more to come? >> look at the short-term move and it looks good. look at a five or six year chart and it's a different story. looks like you've got more room on the upside. >> rick santelli, jump in here. what are you seeing in chicago the mov
job losses. the carmaker is attempting to put the brakes on its losses in europe. the plant shutdown becomes the first for germany since world war ii. italian bond yields headed higher following news that prime minister mario monti plans to resign. monti's reign will come to an end in february, following passage of the 2013 budget. the move raises political concerns over italy in the midst of the eurozone crisis. monti has been credited with keeping italy's debt crisis under control. the japanese economy has some gross domestic problems. japan's gdp has contracted two quarters in a row, signaling it has entered recession. a recent territorial dispute with the chinese government and struggles following last year's tsunami continue to hurt japan's export market. an election next week in japan could have a large effect on fiscal policy. reports say delta is close to landing a deal that will give the airline a 49% stake in virgin atlantic. bloomberg reports talks between delta and singapore airlines, which is looking to sell its stake in virgin, are advancing. the deal is estimated to co
or pertain to europe or all of it? >> it pertains it a variety of things. first of all, ingenuity of u.s. corporations is outstanding. they got lean, mean and made money. profit margins went it a record high. now they are under pressure. so i'm not sure if we can keep that same level of high level profit margins. i think have you wild cards in europe and certainly we are very reminiscent of the debt ceiling fiasco we saw last year. >> yes, yes. all right, thank you, arthur. dear friend. >> my pleasure. >>> now to brian with the market flash. bri some. >> shares of aig up about 3%. their asian interest aia, basically going to get about 6 billion plus in terms of net on that deal so they will be out of that position. if you put into account, being out of their commit many to the u.s. government now putting cash in the bank to the tune of 6 to $6.5 billion, aig continues to look stronger every single day. up about 50% year to date. back to you. >> thank pup next half hour. bonds, are they in a bubble ready to burst? many thought it would happen this year, and they were wrong. we will disc
to southern europe so we are quite well-placed. mainly in northern europe, which has been somewhat less effective, so we are somewhat stable there. good growth in asia-pacific and latin america and frankly the united states as well. liz: the competitor, cisco coming in, they want into the optical switch business ramping up, how would you stay ahead of them? >> they're very specialist player. we're not trying to be all things to all people. as such we have a lot of leading technology in this space and already won a lot of the major deals ready to roll out. tracy: are you hiring now going forward? here in the u.s.? speaker yes, we're actually doing some hiring in the united states. liz: good to see you, have a happy holiday. >> thank you, you two. liz: 46% over the past year. gary smith saying they have a good year ahead. the fed are going after a star in the hedge fund world through employee who left the company two years ago going so hard to the point they want a former employee to flip and cooperate with the investigation. charlie gasparino has the latest on the screws content to be ti
minister resignation soon and the impact on europe's debt crisis. crude and in the day down $0.37 $85.56 per barrel. gasoline has come down $0.10 over the past few weeks. korn falling to a three-week low so far i'm growing demand overseas for supplies from the u.s. soybeans also dropping on slowing demand. david: peter kenny, to see his communicates, some of the best material on what is happening in the market around the world. we have him here live. and peter barnes with the latest developments on the fiscal cliff negotiations, but let's art in chicago with john, two very interesting situations continuing, drama over the fiscal cliff in d.c. and also this week we have the fed meeting. which is more important to the market? >> eventually it will be the fiscal cliff that is more important to the market, but make no doubt about it, the fed meeting with the announcement wednesday morning and wednesday afternoon is going to continue to support risk assets. you were talking about how the dollar is melting up for the fourth consecutive day. the federal reserve will make a very active effort
again, very tiny amounts of electricity, and in europe, we're seeing the green guru, james lovelock calls it the greatest folly on europe, relying on wind power to help base llad of electricity. denmark which people holds model, has not shut a single coal based plant or carbon based plant since they went all wind. sandra: easy to get emotional. so let's put facts. energy department under current administration spent $1.69 billion in loan guaranties for wind projects. >> yes. sandra: so far no offshore wind pardon me is operating today in american waters but yet we are now announcing tens of millions of more dollars being spent to do so. >> yeah. looks like first ones might go online in new jersey in 2013 or 2014. so it is still far away. even once you get it though, you still have all the other environmental issues from bird impacts, unsightlyness of it. it is intermittent power. all the money going into it, at the same time, we're shutting down coal and now the obama administration has announced its intent to go after natural gas tracking and shale oil -- fracking and shale oil bec
that he is in the running tells you quite a lot about the importance of europe this year. earlier today, we were talking about the fact that they had picked trichet on in the past. he doesn't necessarily regret it. he said oppose dollars to some of the other types of running, they look for someone who is having a positive impact. they did consider angela merkel. that's the answers with regard to the person of the year. let me give you a quick sense of what else has been happening in europe overnight. the big moves, we're coming out of asia. 4.3% of the shanghai composite. it just had its best day in three years. this follows some pmi data that supported the idea of domestic spending. of course, it's been this coiled spring market over the last couple of weeks. after we saw the shanghai fall below the 2,000 level, it's in several big days. the news agency tweeted a picture of chinese stockbrokers grinning this morning to give you a sense of the mood. compare that to the nikkei which was down this morning going into the election these weekend likely to put shinzo abe back in power. he's s
surpassed north maeshg and europe combined in terms of global power, based upon gdp, population size, military spending and technological spending. china alone will probably have the largest economy, surpassing that of the united states a few years before 2030. people because of technology, people really have more power than they've ever had before, individuals have more power an that can also cause problems with, you know, people using technology for ill means. >> is this the whole report? >> the 140-page rundown. i'm sure the president gets a bigger one. >> this is an intelligence report. >> yes. >> why on earth would anyone buy a jillion dollar card for starbucks. >> this is the question of the surgery. they had a $450 stainless steel elite card. now they're on ebay getting them for maybe $1,000. some is of the bids are up to $1,000. it's collectors item for the to be 1%. these starbucks limited edition gift cards have sparked a frenzy on ebay of people who want to hold on to this. >> it's the perfect gift for people who like to buy overpriced coffee already. >> you get perks, lik
and grow when the entitlement culture become permanent like europe. of the last one. you are a young man surrounded by people the same age. when you come out and talk like you are talking now what is the reaction? >> a lot of the marston's. they never heard it before especially from teachers across the country. they never heard the tenets of capitalism in our schools and that is what our group turningpoint usa is doing. i go to lecture halls and high school band is about talking about the morality of capitalism versus the morality of government dependency and i truly believe young people want to be free. young people want to make their decisions and because of that there is hope. stuart: if you ever come in your queue set on the set with us because we like what you have to say. good stuff indeed. thank you. you want to add anything to that? you are the ceo when you hired these youngsters. >> i agree. stuart: do you seeethat entitlement mentality in the work force, the young work force that is coming in? >> i see and that mentality, i don't agree with the president on his position on enti
deduction will deteriorate. we are seeing a fiscal drag in europe. i would argue that we should smooth into this drag even more. make policy changes so next year the gdp is half of this speed limit. that would be consistent with extending an emergency program and some form of tax holiday. in terms of the debt ceiling, that needs to be increased. it would be nice to extend it at the next presidential election. it would be nicer to get rid of it altogether. it is anachronistic law that is a problem. it creates a great deal of uncertainty. as you can see, it can do a lot of damage to the economy. there are a lot of reasons why it is being considered to eliminate that ceiling. it should be carefully considered. at the very minimum, we should push this to the other side of the election. we do not want to address the debt ceiling on a regular basis. it is damaging confidence. on fiscal sustainability, we need deficit reduction in the next 10 years of about $3 trillion. to get there, a balanced approach would be $1.4 trillion in tax revenue. half of that would come through tax reform and the
is set to open below 13,000. markets in europe mixed after a shortened session in the uk, france and spain. our road map starts right where we were months ago, waiting for the 112th congress to agree on a debt reduction package. the senate convenes at 11:00 a.m. >> the dow had its worst day in a month on friday. set to close december with a loss. the question is, does it continue to sell off if there isn't an accord in congress. >> we will always have china. manufacturing pmi data from last night is the best in 21 months. can we finally say the chinese economy has been stabilized. >> but of course, we start in washington. as you know, congress comes back today. the house gaveling into session now with legislative business starting at 10:00 a.m. the senate returns at 11:00 a.m. eastern. there are only a few hours left to get a deal done. eamon? >> you're already hearing people talk the way they talk on new year's day. a lot of people wish they could go back in time and do things differently. that's the way people are talking in washington about this fiscal cliff. feeling as if thi
off than those who had to work in the fields but i think that is a debatable subject. if europe fields laid you put in a grueling 14 hours a day but after work the night was your own. a house servant like paul jennings could be called upon any time to service those in the big house. of course for jennings the most galling part of it was when he had to go back to washington with dolley leaving his wife and children behind and after his wife died these are motherless children. i think that was his final motivating factor to say now, not later. yes, sir. >> one thing i noticed about your book is it seems to tie historical parks that don't appear to be related. the rescue of the great painting of george washington. it has occurred to me for a long time that by stating that in addition to the fact that it is a great work, it would have retarded what later became the arc of u.s./british reconciliation. that is not the purpose of your book but has that occurred to you? it has occurred to me for some time. >> they will indeed have enjoyed defiling the image of the father of our country. >> may
the underlying economy is improving. now you get china. if europe can stabilize, i think we can go much higher. >> how many days, if you add headline that monty was thinking about, going out and bursceloni was thinking about coming back. follow me on twitter. and "power lunch" begins right now. >> halftime is over. "power lunch" and second half of the trading day starts right now. >> and here we are. welcome to "power lunch." as you can see, we are beth here on the floor of the new york stock exchange. and stocks are higher as fiscal cliff song and dance continues in washington. mr. boehner says he is waiting for a proposal from this gentleman, the president. president obama. and the president is set to speak about the cliff and the a economy later today. >> i thought i was supposed to come here today. you thought you were supposed to come here today. so we are both here. not really, folks. a lot of talk today is about what investors should do if we go over the cliff. what should we do if there is a debt deal before year-end or shortly thereafter. we have smart strategies and individual stock
just have to look at europe where they have all these kind work rules, like you mentioned this vacation do over. she's a new european thing. >> steve: how does that work? >> i have a doctor's note, i got sick on vacation. by law, i'm allowed to compensatory vacation time for that. >> steve: let's say you're gone for two weeks and say i was sick, you get another two weeks? >> exactly. or how about severance pay. that sounds kind. you got to pay people if you fire them. in spain, the old rule was 3 1/2 years. so nobody is going to hire somebody 'cause if you don't like them, you got to pay them for more than 3 years. >> steve: it wasn't progressive. so if you had just been an employee for a certain number of years or something like that, you get an automatic 3 1/2 year severance? >> no, it doesn't take effect unless you've worked there for a year. so lots of people -- >> steve: wait a minute. you work there one year? >> that's right. now they've shortened. they'll only have to pay $200,000. no wonder spain has a 25% unemployment rate and they're rioting. >> steve: what about what the gove
ports of the world, india, europe, china, who wanted to stay here after they graduated and work on their companies, create new start-ups, but they were unable to do so because after you graduate you get a job with an existing company or you leave and for many them that was not a good option and they left and took their ideas and companies with them. >> so they get their fancy education here and go back to indian or somewhere else. >>guest: we would like to stem the tide and keep them closer, and bring them back to the united states so they can create new jobs. and new companies. >> if they worked for a company they could have stayed? >>guest: if you get sponsored by a large corporation you can get the prop visas to work in the country but you cannot self sponsor and you cannot be here and create your own start-ups without going through some pretty significant legal work. >> to build this big ship where people live cost as lot of money and people are actually giving you money for this? >>guest: the face book funder and creator of pay pay pal is helping us and bringing in a number
reporter there, in europe. and so i think you're going to see these two companies combine with ice taking over the nyse. you're going to see a much stronger company, a company that is going to do very well. and i think the stockholders are going do very well because of that. >> susie: we're go stock watching that story right here in our backyard. we will be watching it closely. thank you so much, real pleasure talking with you. senator judd gregg, former republican senator from new hampshire. >> i'm >> reporter: i'm ruben ramirez. still ahead, we'll take a look at how mobile payment technology may soon replace having to carry a plastic credit card. >> tom: we got another look at the economy between july and september, and it grew faster than first thought. third quarter gdp was revised higher today to just over 3%. that's up from the first estimate of 2.7%, and more than double the growth in the second quarter. fast forward to last week, and more americans filed for first- time unemployment insurance. new claims for jobless benefits rose by 17,000 to 361,000. but home sales continue stren
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